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Unraveled: Stitches and Pages, 0620

Joining in with Kat & friends for my first Unraveled Wednesday! This is a weekly opportunity to quickly share current knitting and reading.

 

I have started a Shades of Green shawl – I know that I have some issues in the 2nd lace section but I’m choosing to just move forward – I’ve decided that as long as I’m at the right stitch count at each section transition it will all work out. Also, I need to put some simple knitting on needles for when I’m watching a show or movie that requires me to be more engaged than lace may allow. The pattern is Washed Out by Joji Locattelli in shades of Winter WonderlandO Christmas TreeTannenbaum in Twisty Toes Glimmer fingering by WIPyarns. This is my first time knitting with this yarn and with this pattern designer – and I’m enjoying both. Given this time of transition, I’m planning out some knitting projects for gifts & for me – there is no reason why yarn & needles shouldn’t be crafting wearables these days!

I recently came across a new to me thriller series . This morning I just finished At Risk by Stella Rimington– the first in the Liz Carlyle series. As I said on Goodreads as I logged this: Not sure how this thriller series wasn’t even on my radar. As a fan of the show MI-5/Spooks as well as Alias and several others in that vein, this series is definitely my cup of tea! This was a very clever story to introduce Liz Carlyle – a tale of both personal & ideological revenge coming to bear in a terrorist attack in the UK. A very detailed story – it was interesting to see how little, seemingly throwaway bits in early chapters built together to the full picture. I’m looking forward to working through this whole series.

Earlier this week I finished Love and Ruin by Paula McClain. This recent release returns to Hemingway’s Women – this time, the focus is on Martha Gellhorn. Martha became his third wife and their stormy relationship plays out in the pages. But more than just “a Mrs. Hemingway” we see Gellhorn as a writer in her own right – someone who jumps overseas to be in the midst of the global turmoil unfolding; someone who struggles to find her voice in the stories she tells – both news reporting and fiction storytelling. As I finished this tale, I was definitely interested to learn more about Martha and appreciated the afternote that the author included in the book – and am also intrigued to track down some of her own works.

In a totally different vein, I’m also reading a few new Southern flavors cookbooks via NetGalley & definitely plan to make some recipes from them to blog about & review – Corncob & Leek Stock – Pecan Cheese Crisps – Zucchini Cornbread Bites – Vegetable Purloo and so many more tasty treats are on my list. As I’ve been reading through both cookbooks, I’ve been calling out numerous recipes to Mom as possible things for us to try – so many things seem to call out for the great farmers market produce we are getting these days.

What is on your needles these days?
What are your recent good reads?

 

Recent Reads – May 2018

In this current season of transition, I’m finding lots of time to dive into books. As I look at my May list, it is too long to share in a single post – so I’ll share thoughts on some of my NetGalley reads and books that had me moving along through several series.

NetGalley Notes

In May, I read several ARCs courtesy of NetGalley and their respective publishers. I have some specific posts planned for some of the books (coming soon) – these are other advanced reads that filled my time.

Send Down the Rain by Charles Martin (*****) – The Charles Martin touch is at work again in this tale weaving together stories of family, sacrifice, PTSD, the Vietnam experience (and aftermath), illegal workers and so much more. As the stories of Jo-Jo, Allie, Catalina and others unfold and converge you are taken on a journey through pain into hope and inspiration and transformation. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are my own. Book is available June 19th.

The Optimist’s Guide to Letting Go by Amy E. Reichart (****) – With this literary meal, Amy E. Reichert dives into a multi-generational tale of mothers and daughters navigating life milestones that resonate with many people today – especially the “sandwich generation” that is focused on parental care and child care at the same time. A story wrapped in grilled cheese and brownies, Gina is navigating life as a recent-ish widow, oldest daughter and mother of a middle-schooler the best that she can with daily to-do lists. When her mother suffers a serious stroke, the stage is set for discovering her mother’s “dark secret” that has shaped life for all of them for decades. At the same time, her distant daughter is discovering a budding relationship with a classmate as they play video games and watch Netflix in the basement. Once again telling the story in Milwaukee, this time the city of Milwaukee is not as much a character in the tale as Milwaukee and Door County have been in earlier works. All in all, a good read that reminds you how family decisions can ripple for decades and also how often times mothers and daughters are more alike than they want to admit. Free ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Book is available May15th.

Kappy King and the Pickle Kaper by Amy Lillard (****) – A fun and breezy “whodunit” set in a charming Amish valley in Pennsylvania, “Kappy King and the Pickle Kaper” has Kappy and Edie on the trail to find the real reason a young Amish woman was killed when a car hit a horse and buggy on the main road. Descriptions of the people and locale reminded me of fun day trips to Lancaster County, PA. An enjoyable read that you can’t help but smile about as you are reading. This is the second in the Kappy King series – but I didn’t feel “at a lost” not yet having read the first book prior to this story. Free ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Book is available June 26th.

Formerly Known as Food by Kristin Lawless (***) –  Formerly Known as Food is jam packed with information about our food production system, the impact of farming and other chemicals on our health, the “magic” of baby digestive systems developing and the lifelong impact they have and so much more. There are several paths of research and education in this book and while each was interesting, it seemed as though they weren’t cohesively presented. Some could read this book and walk away with a sense of “we’re doomed” because of the detail about how some chemicals and treatment exposures have multi-generational impacts and so we have already impacted our grandchildren and beyond with the chemicals in our lives. Others may walk away feeling like they want to get engaged by aren’t sure what to do. The book can be filed on the book shelf with many other books that I’ve read about the state of food production and health today – and seems best suited for people that are reading across the spectrum of food/health books. Compared with other books of this vein, I felt like the author was more self focused in her narrative than some others. Free ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Book is available June 19th.

Also in NetGalley,  three food books that I shared last week.

Serial Stories

I visited several novel series during May – some books were returning to old favorites and some were new discoveries that I’ll work my way through as time allows…

  • Visiting Inspector Gamanche in Three Pines with How the Light Gets In  & The Long Way Home  – I continue to enjoy working my way through these tales and will continue to read these along the way.
  • Returning to River Heights with a re-read of the very first Nancy Drew – The Secret of the Old Clock – inspired by a tweet highlighting it had been 80 years since the series began.
  • Keeping current with Cotton Malone in The Bishop’s Pawn by Steve Berry. The latest offering in this series that I have been hooked into in recent years – this story is told differently than others in the series – it is essentially the “origin” story of how Cotton Malone joined the Magellan Billet. Told in more of a flashback approach, this tale revolves around a case concerning the “real” story of MLK Jr.’s death.
  • Finishing the Divergent trilogy by “finally” reading Allegiant by Veronica Roth. I had read the 2 previous books “back to back” several years ago & really enjoyed them. While packing to move in March, the 2 movies on TV provided entertainment & triggered me to finally finish the series.
  • In The Demon Crown by James Rollins, Six Sigma is called upon to save the world from engineered bees that threaten to wipe out life as we know it. Part of this story involved an attack on Hawaii and the possibility of needing to annhialite all lifeforms there for the good of the world – it was a bit “odd” to be reading this just as the latest Kilauea eruptions were starting several weeks ago & evacuations were being implemented.
  • Stepping back into the Pink Carnation spy adventures with The Garden Intrigue by Lauren Willig – it has been several years since I picked up this series which is a mash-up of spies/intrigue & regency romance & present day chick-lit.
  • Visiting Lavender Tides in The View from Rainshadow Bay by Colleen Coble. I picked this up to read ahead of a NetGalley read of the 2nd book in the series (to be shared later). The “blurb” on the cover of the book said you’d stay up late reading it – indeed I did. A nice mix of relational story lines & mystery/thriller story lines that has me looking forward to continuing the series.
  • In Mr. Churchill’s Secretary by Susan Elia Macneal, I had a first introduction to Maggie Hope  in a story laying the foundation for following her exploits as a WWII spy and code breaker. This will be a fun series to work through.

I have a few other worthwhile fiction reads that I will share later this week.

What are you reading these days?

Joining in with Show Us Your Books hosted by Stephanie & Jana.

3 Food Reads

For today’s Three on Thursday, three food related books that I read as advanced copies via NetGalley. Two cookbooks that have me tagging recipes to make and an ode to Chicago pizza that has me missing the tavern style pizza that I used to get from the local bar around the corner from my apartment. I have beets and apples in the fridge that will be turned into Yellow Beet & Apple Jam this week based on the first of these books.

Ciderhouse Cookbook by Jonathan Carr, Nicole Blum, Andrea Blum – **** – Reading through Ciderhouse Cookbook is like stepping into the kitchen and sitting down around the table of the apple farmers that wrote the book. Starting with simple cider syrups and vinegars, the cookbook walks through a full menu of recipes that draw on apples and ciders to add that extra spark to the plate, bowl or glass. As I read through this cookbook, I was continually reading out titles and descriptions to my Mom & making a list of recipes to try – not only as apple season returns but also throughout the summer and the farmers market bounty. Free ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Book is available July 24th.

Pizza City USA by Steve Dolinsky  – **** – A tasty treatise on the pizza that feeds Chicago. Outside of Chicago, most people assume that Chicago style pizza is the big deep dish pie. Those who have lived there know that is just one of many types and really isn’t even the best option out there. As a former Chicago city resident, reading this book provided some fond memories of a couple of different pizzerias that were favorites while I was there. Beyond just reviews and pictures of pizzerias, Steve Dolinsky brings his journalism chops to the table and provides a history of pizza in the city and also a smart education on pizza basics. This book had me longing for a Windy City pie and also has me looking at pizza everywhere through a new and more knowledgeable lens. Free ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Book is available September 15th. Bonus: The author has now started a Pizza Tour (https://pizzacityusa.com/) that allows you to sample some of the pies in the book – sounds like a great addition to Chicago tourist fun.

The Fat Kitchen by Andrea Chesman – **** – More than “just” a cookbook, “The Fat Kitchen” provides an in-depth guide to all manners of animal fat – offering instructions on how to render the fats into goodness that will add an extra level of deliciousness to your cooking and baking. The information and recipes in this book provide a great reference for taking the leap into using more animal fat within your kitchen. Free ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Book is available November 13th.

Joining the Three on Thursday link-up hosted by Carole

Recently – May 2018

Ah, MAY…a month filled with spring showers and blooms and summer heat and humidity…celebrating friends at a wedding…Mom celebration days (Mother’s Day & birthday)…and more…these are the things that filled my MAY days…

Focusing…on the job hunt by getting involved with the outplacement/career coach service that has been provided and also connecting with a local weekly job seekers group.

Bubbling…finally buying supplies for homemade Boba (bubble tea) & wondering why it took so long to start doing this at home. A favorite blueberry infusion made for a great boba. Another winner is using an Arnold Palmer version. Nutpods are a tasty milk component for these ( the limited edition vanilla lemon, especially). We anticipate many of these in our future.

Voting…in the Georgia primary that included a high school classmate on the ballot.

Visiting…Dad’s gravesite ahead of Memorial Day with our dear friend that had served as deputy to Dad while they were on missile crew in Kansas. Jack’s visit with us was filled with many great memories and stories of Dad.

Lunching…at the charming Wild Daisy B&B and Farm Café down in Molena – we discovered this farm through our new farmers market and after checking out their Facebook page, we knew we needed to visit. After an April visit with Mom & Rebecca, Mom & I have enjoyed some “ladies who lunch” trips down there with friends in May. Everything we’ve ordered from their delicious menu has been a winner. And their desserts are fabulous – the coconut cake and strawberry cake can’t be missed.

Marketing…Saturday mornings mean visiting a new local farmers market. Mom & I are regulars there now – it’s fun to chat with the farmers each week and be building relationships with them. Local honey. Homemade salsa verde. Delicious baked goods. Beautiful wildflower bouquets. Gorgeous and delicious produce. Thriving annuals. Always ending the market run with refreshing local cold brew.

Cooking…all the farmers market finds provided so many great components for tasty meals…lots of simple roasted veggies…a kale & broccoli salad is in the rotation that is my version of the Chick-fil-A Superfoods Salad…beautiful green salads, and more…

Participating…in the Leadercast Live 2018 event to start the month…a great day filled with great speakers…and my notebook filled with many pages of great nuggets to bring back & focus on leading myself…a very timely event as I’m navigating the job search for my next role now that I’m back home in the Ville…

Reading…all the time…between NetGalley and the local library, I see that I’ve read 26 books this month (on top of a full April) – details about the May reads coming on June 12th.

Scooping…stopping by the nearest Culver’s for a $1 scoop of classic vanilla custard in support of their Thank You Farmers Project. You can’t go wrong with classic vanilla!

Looking ahead…no major plans for June…but farmers market runs, books & job search are on the docket, for sure…

What filled your May days?

Connecting up with Leigh Kramer for the What I’m Into link-up.

Recently Read – April

Since being back home in the Ville, my reading progress has soared! In the last month, I have doubled my 2018 reads. Among the “settling into the Ville” tasks for me was getting a library card & I have been putting it to good use already. Also, I’ve finally started utilizing NetGalley for some advanced reads. Here, some snapshots from my April reading list.

The Last Sword Maker by Brian Nelson – A techno-thriller that takes several current technologies and scientific discoveries and tweaks them into more frightening possibilities that threaten to alter the world in drastic ways. Taking place in the near future, this tale of utilizing DNA to target and wipe out specific people and people groups leaves you at the last page pondering “what-if” and other implications of taking some of these discoveries to the extreme. Free ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Book is available October 16th.

The Lido by Libby Page –  A story of community and the importance of time and place to come together from all backgrounds into a common purpose. A quick and cheerful read that leaves you thankful for the multi-generational relationships and communities that you have in your own life. Free ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Book is available June 19th.

Tangerine by Christine Mangan –  – A spring release that keeps getting mentioned  & has a spot on book cover recommendation blurb: “As if Donna Tartt, Gillian Flynn, and Patricia Highsmith had collaborated on a screenplay to be filmed by Hitchcock” —Joyce Carol Oates A quick paced story set in  Morocco – filled with the mystique of a foreign land – a newlywed orphan feeling adrift in the dusty and bustling city of Tangiers as her husband pursues a mysterious job. When her former college roommate suddenly appears on her doorstep the temperature rises and life boils over with discontent, jealousy and dark secrets in the heat of a land in turmoil. A Kindle deal.

A Life Intercepted by Charles Martin – Once again, opening a Charles Martin book is a soothing balm – this time, an engaging story of a star football player…well, after an amazing high school and college career he was set to be the #1 draft pick until he was accused of an unthinkable crime and spent the next 12 years in prison. When he is released, he comes back to his small Georgia down to try to rebuild his life – a parole condition of no contact with children is put to the test when he is asked to quietly coach a high school player at his old school. As the story unfolds, we learn the true story of how the start came to be accused and a story of redemption and forgiveness unfolds. A Kindle deal.

Super Natural Every Day by Heidi Swanson – A cookbook from a food blogger that I used to follow in the heyday of blogging. Lots of fresh fruit and veggie based recipes that look like they will be fun to try as the local farmers markets kick into high season. A Kindle deal.

The Lost Words Bookshop by Stephanie Butland – A tale of lost and found with a main character so guarded that it takes you a while to get to know her. A clever story that seemed to cross several different flavors of reads that I enjoy. It is more than a “bookshop story that draws in learnings from favorite books.” It is more than the story of a young woman with a mysterious past that is told in present time and also by jumping back into her history. It is more than a young woman trying to figure out her way in the world. Woven into the storyline is an ode to the tactile memory we all have as we hold a book in our hands and are transported back to the time/place/moment of reading that book for the first time and the memories that will always be invoked. Free ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Book is available June 19th.

Natural Disaster by Ginger Zee – I first started seeing Ginger Zee weather reports when I lived in Chicago – she was at my “default” news station. In recent years, I see her whenever I have “Good Morning America” on as I get ready – more often than not, that seems to be while on the road. This was a quick and candid read that provides insights into her career and also unflinchingly shares her struggles with depression and that impact on her choices and life.  New Release borrowed from my local library.

Epitaph by Mary Doria Russell – Picking up in Tombstone, AZ this novel recounts the life and times of Doc Holliday and the Earp brothers leading up to and after the famous/infamous shootout at the OK Corral. A richly crafted story of the full cast of characters – on both sides of the shootout as well as their supporting cast of wives, girlfriends, town locals and more. This is the follow-up to Doc that I read last month. I snagged a Kindle deal on this one. 

What are you reading these days?

Linking of with other readers via “Show Us Your Books” with Stephanie and Jana.

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