Amy Artisan

Family | Travel | Craft | Life | Books

Of Bibs & Books

One of the things that I have always liked about the “Grandma’s favorite” dishcloth pattern is the simplicity of it. You don’t have to think – your hands can just knit & your brain doesn’t even have to be “on” in order to make progress. Even with the larger baby blanket size of the pattern it still “moves.” A new “simple knit” favorite is the Baby Bib in the Mason Dixon book – a bit of “garter stitch back and forth” and before you know it you’re looking for a cute button to finish off a cute gift.

While at my parents house in GA this weekend I whipped up 2 bibs. On Sunday afternoon Mom & I searched through her button tin as well as my Grandma’s tin – in addition to finding great buttons for these bibs I also pulled out several buttons to use on future bibs. The Faded Denim bib will be gifted by my sister to Baby Jackson. The Cool Breeze bib does not yet have a recipient but is ready to gift at a moment’s notice.

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The weekend with the family was lowkey and just the recharge I needed from a stressful week. As a thunderstorm rolled in on Saturday afternoon I finished up my latest summer read – The Harmony Silk Factory by Tash Aw. Another very enjoyable book – the story of a Malaysian man in the 1940s - told through the eyes of the son, the wife and a loyal friend.

I’m now reading “this summer’s book” – The Memory Keeper’s Daughter by Kim Edwards. So far it is an engaging read. In fact, I had to force my self to turn out the light last night because I knew the alarm would come quickly at 4:30 this morning (and it did).

I’m planning to make it to the Stitches Midwest Market on Saturday afternoon – anyone else going to be there then & want to meet up?

11 Comments

  1. I have wanted to make the bibs, too. They seem like great gifts and fun to knit. Plus it would be fun to do a variation on a dishcloth.

    I like hearing your book suggestions. Both sound great.

  2. Hi Amy,

    What pretty yarn you have for the bibs! Very summery.

    That sounds heavenly, to read through a thunderstorm!

  3. These bibs look so very cute, and they sure must be the perfect knit – quick and not much concentration needed – perfect for in between “bigger” projects!
    Thanks also for your book recommendations, they sound very interesting and I’ll make sure to have a look for both of them!

  4. Love the bibs!
    Even though I am in library school, I am dreadfully out of touch with what the hot new books are – thanks for telling me! Of course, right after I saw your mention of it, I heard something on the radio about the same exact book! Now I really want to read it ! 🙂

  5. It was really good to have you home this weekend and to see the bibs (and the sash) and especially YOU. You should see the back yard now…

  6. I love those bibs too. So easy to knit!

  7. Cute bibs! My Aunt uses the “Grandma’s Favorite” pattern for quick baby blankets. She throws in some eyelets (YO, K2TOG) throughout the blanket and they turn out real cute. Once I saw one where she made the eyelets in the shape of a heart. Of course, my Aunt is a Jedi Master Knitter who never has to chart anything; she just makes it up as she knits along.

  8. Those bibs are cute.

    Stitches Midwest! One of these days I’m going to fly out for that one. (I missed Stitches West this year though). Have fun! Buy lots.

  9. I have never seen a knitted bib before…so cute!

    And I just clicked on the link for Stitches Midwest Market. If I had known all my dreams would come true I would have made plans to go. Bummer. My dreams are jealous of your dreams. Looks like fun!

  10. I’m not over the warshrags yet, but I can tell I’ll have to move along to the bibs!

  11. those bibs are soooo cute – have you seen the cute bibs in one skein – I’m going to try my hand at those which are petals! its cute knitting for babies

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